Thursday, September 15, 2011

Letters of Love & Deception: Book Give-away DAY THREE

Quiz the Third
of the e-book give-away of
Letters of Love & Deception 

To celebrate the upcoming release of Letters of Love & Deception and other Austenesque short stories, we're giving away six free e-books, in the format of your choice, in honour of Jane Austen's six novels.    

Comment below, and you'll be eligible to win either one of five copies of Letters of Love & Deception or a copy Nachtsturm Castle: A Gothic Austen Novel from Girlebooks.com!

The giveaway runs from Wednesday through to Monday, Sept. 19th, the official release date!  And don't forget that you can still comment in Wednesday and Thursday's quizzes!

If you want a preview of the short stories in LOL&D, click here!

The rules in brief:

Post a comment with answers to the quiz below (making sure to leave contact info) and your name will be entered to win a free e-book.  Each time you comment, on any of the quizzes, your name will be entered again.  So answer early and often!

And never fear if you don't know the answers off the top of your head!  You can look up the answers, or crib from the person above you (maybe even add some more information!), or just make it up and make us laugh!  It's all in good fun.

On Monday at midnight, the giveaway will close and six winners will be chosen!  Comment away!
Quiz the Third

Novels: They say that the first line of a novel is the most important.  Can you name any of Jane's first sentences?  (Bonus point for non-P&P!)


History: What is the difference between a spencer and a pelisse?

Literature: So often movie adaptations of novels must leave out something.  What part of any of Austen's novels do you always hope to see on the screen...and you haven't yet?  (A line, a scene, a character - anything goes!)

Austen: What did Jane ask her sister to do with her personal correspondence upon her death?  (And what secret do you think was hidden in them?)

Austenesque: Mary Crawford has just dared you to win a glass of lemonade from her brother, Henry.  What tactics do you use?

11 comments:

  1. I decided to do a montage and let you sort them out: It is a truth universally acknowledged that the family Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex, where, about thirty years ago, Miss Maria Ward admired Emma Woodhouse, who seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence. Contrariwise, no one (not even Sir Walter Elliot, of Kellynch-hall, in Somersetshire) who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine.

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  2. Shannon! That's brilliant! I got it this morning and it made me laugh! :D

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  3. yay Shannon you clever gal you! funny =))
    ok, The family Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex.
    straight from the open book on my desk beside me!
    comes from participating in the indiejane reading group! =)) grabbing a quick few pages between work!...

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  4. a spencer is the short close fitting jacket worn by women and children in the 19th century
    whereas, the pelisse is a Regency era woman's long fitted coat with set-in sleeves and the then-fashionable Empire waist...

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  5. regarding Jane's correspondence, i've read several comments and various thoughts about it. here's just one, " Close consideration shows that the destruction was probably because Jane had either described physical symptoms rather too fully ... or else because she had made some comment about other members of the family which Cassandra did not wish posterity to read. (Letters, pp. xv-xvi)"
    and this -
    "She knew best her sister’s wishes and opinions about privacy. Her loving memories of her sister led her to cover up those little remarks that people make when they believe they are alone. These flippant, or very truthful, remarks would have been carefully edited by Cassandra when she read them aloud to her mother or other family members, when each new letter arrived at Chawton cottage. Cutting out portions, or whole pages, or whole letters, was a more permanent way of keeping those remarks between themselves."

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  6. actually, i'm pretty sure Jane discussed her fave beaux with passionate deets and while Cassandra had thoroughly enjoyed it she was just a little protective of her baby sister, so it had to go !! not one for hanging out the family laundry for prying eyes and gossiping tongues... =))

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  7. winning a glass of lemonade from the rakish Henry?
    i'd walk straight toward him, capture his gaze, lower my lashes, then glance sideways at him whilst i query, "will you keep all that lemonade for yourself, Henryboy? shall I have to beg for one drop? or will you share that pitcherfull with me?" and he'd be stumbling over himself to grab a glass and pour without splashing the lemonade all over himself and table, all the while with eyes transfixed on this unfamiliar yet unforgettable approach...

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  8. 1) No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be an heroine.

    2) A spencer was a jacket, cropped to fit well over the high waisted Regency gowns. A pelisse was a longer coat, still with the high waist, but cut to fall about to mid-calf.

    3) *sigh* Why do all the versions of P&P leave out Elizabeth's best line to Lady Catherine? "These are heavy misfortunes, but the wife of Mr. Darcy must have such extraordinary sources of happiness attached to her situation, that she could, upon the whole, have no cause to repine."

    The BBC version starts the quote, with Elizabeth saying, "These are heavy misfortunes indeed," but she does not finish it. I'm not sure it even gets that much of a nod in the 2005 version. And here's the thing: That's the kind of thing Lady Catherine would have remembered and passed on to Darcy verbatim, because to her, Elizabeth was saying, "Hey, he's got money and a nice house--who cares what the rest of the world thinks of our marriage?"

    *cough* Okay, I'll step off the soap box now. But you can guess what line features heavily in my novel!

    4)I'm with Faith on this one... I think there were some rather more salacious details in those letters that Cassandra didn't want people to read. Not racy, of course, but something that didn't fall in line with the St. Jane picture the family created after her death.

    5)I would tell Henry that it would vex his sister if he gave me a glass.

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  9. wouldn't it be FuN to find the scene of the Dashwoods arriving at the Middleton's with the terrors running wild as described in the book? just a bit of a reality check on all the finely mannered versions that disregard this oft repeated fact in S&S!

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  10. the following scenes in particular would be entirely gratifying ~ to see Lucy Steele receiving Lady Middleton's children's "imperinent encroachments and mischievous tricks...sashes untied, their hair pulled about their ears, their work-bags searched, and their knives and scissors stolen away" all whilst Lady Middleton "felt no doubt of its being a reciprocal enjoyment."! hahah! just a bit of humourous indulgence there =))

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  11. Novels: They say that the first line of a novel is the most important. Can you name any of Jane's first sentences? (Bonus point for non-P&P!)
    No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be an heroine (obviously, dear, you know which one this is from ;))

    History: What is the difference between a spencer and a pelisse?
    A spencer is more a short jacket while I believe a pelisse is longer. I'm going to have to research this now.

    Literature: So often movie adaptations of novels must leave out something. What part of any of Austen's novels do you always hope to see on the screen...and you haven't yet? (A line, a scene, a character - anything goes!)
    I feel like in every adaption of Emma that I've seen, there's always some of the crucial interaction between Knightley and Emma left out. While the Paltrow version does a really nice job of building their chemistry (the archery scene, the first scene by the fire at Hartfield, etc), there's just more to them than the movies really touch on.

    Austen: What did Jane ask her sister to do with her personal correspondence upon her death? (And what secret do you think was hidden in them?)
    She asked her to burn them. I rather think that it wasn't a grand secret that she possessed, but that she was a private person who preferred her personal life to end at her death.

    Austenesque: Mary Crawford has just dared you to win a glass of lemonade from her brother, Henry. What tactics do you use?
    Well, I'm an outrageous flirt, so I shall bat my fan most becomingly and make witty comments about being parched. I'm clever like that.

    -Erica from Regency Ladies

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